Cdc crypto

Cdc crypto

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Cryptosporidium is a microscopic parasite that causes the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis. Both the parasite and the disease are commonly known as “Crypto. There are many species of Cryptosporidium that infect animals, some of which also infect humans. The parasite is protected by an outer shell that allows it to survive outside the body for long periods of time and makes it very tolerant to chlorine disinfection. Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of waterborne disease among humans in the United States. Menu IconA vertical stack of three evenly spaced horizontal lines.

Be careful when you go for a swim in the neighborhood pool this summer. The parasite is the most common cause of diarrhea linked to swimming pools and water parks, and it spreads when people swallow something that has come into contact with the feces of a sick person, such as pool water. In 2016, there were at least 32 outbreaks in the country, double the number in 2014. In 2016, Ohio identified 1,940 people with crypto after observing as many as 571 cases annually between 2012 and 2015. The crypto parasite is hard to kill — it can survive the standard levels of chlorine and other pool disinfectants that kill most other germs within a few minutes. Keeping crypto out of a pool also means relying on people to be responsible about showering before getting in and staying away from the water if they’ve recently had diarrhea. In 2010, the CDC launched a DNA-fingerprinting tracking system for identifying crypto outbreaks.

To avoid getting sick, the CDC recommends not swallowing any water while you swim — easier said than done, of course, but it takes just a mouthful of contaminated water to make you sick. Experts also urge people to rinse off before diving in and to have frequent bathroom breaks for kids. They also suggest changing diapers for young ones in a separate area away from the pool. And if you’ve been sick with crypto? Stay out of the water, please. Between 2000 and 2014, the CDC recorded 493 disease outbreaks related to treated recreational water, resulting in more than 27,000 illnesses and eight deaths.